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Big Friday Agreement

The agreement was reached between the British and Irish governments and eight political parties or groups in Northern Ireland. Three were representative of unionism: the Ulster Unionist Party, which had led Unionism in Ulster since the early twentieth century, and two smaller parties linked to loyalist paramilitaries, the Progressive Unionist Party (associated with the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) and the Ulster Democratic Party (the political wing of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA)). Two of them have generally been described as nationalists: the Social Democratic and Labour Party and Sinn Féin, the Republican Party associated with the Commissional Irish Republican Army. [4] [5] Regardless of these rival traditions, there were two other rallying parties, the Alliance Inter-communal party and the Northern Ireland Women`s Coalition. There was also the Labour Coalition. U.S. Senator George J. Mitchell was sent by U.S. President Bill Clinton to lead discussions between the parties and groups.

[6] She added: “If the UK violates this international treaty and Brexit undermines the Good Friday Agreement, there will be absolutely no chance that a trade deal between the US and Britain will go through Congress. Political parties in Northern Ireland, which endorsed the agreement, were also invited to consider the creation of an independent advisory forum, with members of civil society with social, cultural, economic and other expertise, and appointed by both administrations. In 2002, a framework for the North-South Consultation Forum was agreed, and in 2006 the Northern Ireland Executive agreed to support its establishment. The agreement reaffirmed its commitment to “mutual respect, civil rights and religious freedoms for all in the community.” The multi-party agreement recognised “the importance of respect, understanding and tolerance with regard to linguistic diversity”, in particular with regard to the Irish language, the Ulster Scots and the languages of other ethnic minorities in Northern Ireland, “all of which are part of the cultural richness of the island of Ireland”. the Good Friday Agreement (GFA) or Belfast Agreement (in Irish: Comhaontú Aoine à Chéasta or Comhaontú Bhéal Feirste); Ulster-Scots: Guid Friday Greeance or Bilfawst Greeance), [1] is a couple of agreements signed on 10 April 1998 that ended most of the violence of the Troubles, a political conflict in Northern Ireland that has emerged since the late 1960s. This was an important development in the peace process in Northern Ireland in the 1990s. Northern Ireland`s current system of de decentralised government is based on the agreement. The Agreement also created a number of institutions between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as well as between the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom. London`s direct rule ended in Northern Ireland when power officially left the new Northern Ireland Assembly, the North-South Council of Ministers and the Anglo-Irish Council, when the first regulations relating to the Anglo-Irish Agreement entered into force on 2 December 1999. [15] [16] [17] In accordance with Article 4(2) of the Anglo-Irish Agreement (Agreement between the British and Irish Governments for the implementation of the Belfast Agreement), the two governments must inform each other in writing of compliance with the conditions for the entry into force of the Anglo-Irish Agreement. entry into force should take place upon receipt of those two notifications. [18] The British government has agreed to participate in a televised ceremony at Iveagh House in Dublin, the Irish Foreign Office.

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